To be recalled or not to be recalled… that is the question…


Maybe you heard the news already that the Center for Auto Safety (CFAS) is petitioning to persuade the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to recall the 1993-2004 models of the Grand Cherokees because of an alleged potential fuel tank fire danger. The CFAS findings after researching crashes were these modeled year Grand Cherokees were involved was that 172 crashes fatal fire crashes resulted in 254 deaths between the years of 1992 to 2008 with 44 of those crashes that resulted in 64 of those deaths most harmful event that led to the deaths – fire.


Chrysler responded to the claim as it being an unsubstantiated review of raw accident data not taking into account cause or origin of the fire, or accurate critical real world accident data that takes into account significant factors that influence crash outcomes, such as the speed of a rear impact and the weight of the vehicles involved. There has been no official recall on the 1993-2004 models of the Grand Cherokees as to date. Here is Chrysler response to the Center for Auto Safety petition:

‘The petition filed with National Highway Traffic Safety Administration by the Center for Automotive Safety presents a simplistic, unsubstantiated review of raw accident data. Indeed, its conclusions are flawed as they are based solely on a database that does not discriminate the cause or origin of a fire. Nor does it contain accurate critical real world accident data that takes into account significant factors that influence crash outcomes, such as the speed of a rear impact and the weight of the vehicles involved. The petition’s conclusions and comparisons are, therefore, invalid and their use to draw alarming conclusions about a product with an excellent safety record is misguided and irresponsible.

Statistically, rear impacts that result in serious injury are rare occurrences. Chrysler Group is confident that a proper study which considered all factors in all collisions including rear collisions with fire would show that the 1993-2004 Jeep Grand Cherokees perform as well as or better than other vehicles in their class.

The 1993-2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee meets or exceeds all applicable federal safety standards and, as noted, has an excellent safety record. There are many millions of 1993-2004 Jeep Grand Cherokees on the road whose owners and families continue to enjoy tens of millions of miles and hours of safe vehicle operation each year.

While Chrysler Group designs vehicles to protect the greatest number of motorists in the greatest number of accidents, unfortunately accidents do occur, can be dangerous and, sadly, can sometimes cause injuries and even deaths.’
It will be interesting to see how this plays out. Stay posted!

Written by Andrew

"You're telling me it's got four wheels, two seats and goes faster than the speed limit? Good, I'm driving."

4 comments

  1. That’s a hard one to call. I don’t havea Grand Cherokee either. Chrysler may just be trying to get out of the expense of a recall. I’m sure that’s how any company would approach this. I hope another study is done, taking in all of the considerations listed. Then, if indicated, I hope Chrysler does the right thing and recalls the vehicles for repair/replacement.

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  2. I’m driving a 2000 Grand Cherokee and this is the first I’ve heard of the problem. I called my dealership and they said it was a bunch of hogwash. I’ve never been in an accident with it, but I don’t want to find out after it’s too late that it really is a problem.

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  3. I thought they always erred on the safe side. Apparently that is not true. If I had a Grand Cherokee, I would want them to fix any potential problems, especiallly if it could result in death.

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