International Full Size Jeep Association and Jeep Funnies!


jeep_wife
When cruising around the world wide web I came across a couple funnies I wanted to share with Jeep Lovers alike – just a little something different to share a little laugh. Of course I came across these tidbits on a Jeep Club site so I will highlight that as well. The site I found the funny tidbits that will follow was the International Full Size Jeep Association.


The definition to what a full size jeep (FSJ) straight from the IFSJA site is:
“An “FSJ” is any vehicle produced in North America, carrying the “Jeep” nameplate, with 2 or 4drs, in 2 or 4wd, whose wheelbase does not exceed 132″, nor is less than 109″, and whose tread width is no more than 63″ or less than 57″. This definition is known to include the following models:
• Cherokee: 1974-1983
• Wagoneer: 1963-1983
• Grand Wagoneer: 1984-1991
• Gladiator and J-series pickup: 1963-1987
• M-715 Military versions and its derivatives
The following vehicles, while not technically Full Size Jeeps, are welcomed here, as they are the honored forebearers of our beloved beasts of burden:
• 1947-1965 Jeep All Steel Wagon
• 1947-1965 Jeep Pickup (not Gladiator)
• Forward Control Trucks (FC-150/FC-170) – although the FC-150 was based on the CJ chassis”

The IFSJA has many chapters if you are interested in joining any of them, here are the links:
New England Chapter
Midwest Chapter
Southeastern US Chapter
Cornbelt Chapter
Red River Valley Chapter
Rocky Mountain Chapter / Colorado Full Size Jeep Association
Southwestern US Chapter
Pacific North West Chapter
Western Canada Chapter

Some other Chapters around our part of the word are:
Club Jeep Gladiator Argentina
The European Chapter

Now for the funnies! I hope you get a chuckle out of them as I did!

The Twelve Full Size Jeep Steps
Contributed By: Ethan Brady

Most of us know about the AA program which helps its members stop drinking, and how there are other “Anonymous” programs, all based on the 12 Steps originally (I think) created by the founders of AA.
Well, we all know WE’RE obsessed with our FSJ’s…
1. We admitted we were powerless over FSJ breakdowns and that our trail damage was just inevitable.
2. Came to believe that only a Power greater than ourselves could restore our FSJ to perfection.
3. Made a decision to turn our money and our time over to the care of our FSJs.
4. Made a searching and fearless inventory of various obsolete and broken “spare parts” in our garage.
5. Admitted to our mechanic, to our spouse and to another FSJ owners, the exact nature of our Jeep’s needed repairs.
6. Were entirely ready to show off and be proud of our FSJ’s unique character.
7. Humbly asked our spouse or significant other to ride in our FSJ, despite any of its shortcomings.
8. Made a list of all persons we had abandoned due to working on our FSJ, and became willing to give free trail rides to them all.
9. Made direct trail ride offers to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or the Jeep.
10. Continued to take personal inventory of spare parts and when we they are no longer needed, promptly donate them to others in need.
11. Sought through upgrades and bigger tires to improve our tractive effort with the trail surface as we four wheel, praying only for operator skill, safety, and the power to carry our Jeep out of the obstacle.
12. Having had a GREAT TIME as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to other fellow FSJ owners and practiced Tread Lightly principles in all our off road affairs.

And if that wasn’t enough for you…

The Twelve Full Size Jeep Traditions
1. Our Jeep’s mechanical welfare should come first; personal off road enjoyment depends upon getting home safely.
2. For group trail rides, there is but one ultimate authority- our Spouse. The trail leaders are trusted servants, but they do not govern when we are allowed to go four wheeling
3. The only requirement for FSJ membership is a desire to have fun in an FSJ.
4. Each Jeep should be autonomous except in matters affecting other Jeeps or four wheeling as a whole.
5. Each Jeep has but one primary purpose: To carry its passengers through trail obstacles and get them home safely.
6. A FSJ owner ought never lend his Jeep to any related family member, lest that person not return the Jeep, and a family quarrel ensue.
7. Every FSJ owner ought to be fully self-supporting, because s/he’ll need the money.
8. FSJ owners may remain forever nonprofessional, but may employ mechanics, as needed.
9. FSJ storage areas need never be organized; but we may create tire and gas can holders, boxes, gadgets and widgets to help further our FSJ enjoyment.
10. FSJ owners should have lots of opinions on FSJ issues; thus the controversy help others make informed decisions.
11. Our public relations policy is based on attraction and promotion; we need always to promote our Jeeps at the level of press, radio, films, television, and other public media of communication.
12. “Real Jeeps Have Frame Rails” is the foundation of all these traditions, ever reminding us to place brute strength and function before fuel economy.

Written by Andrew

"You're telling me it's got four wheels, two seats and goes faster than the speed limit? Good, I'm driving."

One comment

  1. I’m sure that’s the picture of me that my husband saw when I first told him he would have to get rid of that old Jeep that he had been working on forever. He pleaded his case and I ended up relenting. That’s been almost 5 years ago. Since then, the Jeep has been repaired and I’ve been converted. I even have my own Jeep, and we go off road together. I can’t believe I almost missed out on all of this fun.

    Like

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