Complete Jeep Axel Assemblies


One of the biggest mistakes that people make when they go four-wheel driving in unknown territory is that they go full bore without checking out the terrain. This often leads the Jeep driver to hitting patches of land that are not meant to be driven even with the best equipped 4×4 vehicle. These types of mistakes often lead to the driver getting stuck and then having to call a friend or tow company to pull them out of the spot. Or worse, they break an axle.

All of us 4x4ers have been to a place where they broke axel assemblies. The good part about being a Jeep owner is that most of parts on the various Jeeps are pretty easy to fix at home if you know what you are doing. The best part is that you can usually pick-up a complete Jeep Axel assembly for less than a grand. And with the step-by step instructions below you can save another grand on labor by doing it yourself. The below steps are just a basic guide for people who are very familiar with auto repair.

Step 1: Loosen the lug nuts on the wheels that are on the axel assembly you are replacing.
Step 2: Push in the emergency brake.
Step 3: Raise the jeep either on a lifter or on jack stands. Do not simply leave the Jeep on a regular jack as this work can cause the car to fall of a regular jack.
Step 4: Take the wheels of the axel you are replacing.
Step 5: With a socket wrench take out the middle spindle nut.
Step 6: Take out the mounting bolts on the brake caliper and secure the caliper to the upper control arm.
Step 7: Take the brake rotor off the hub.
Step 8: With a pair of pliers remove the cotter pin from the drive shaft.
Step 9: Remove the driveshaft.
Step 10: Loosen the tie rod end bolt.
Step 11: Remove the hub and steering knuckle assembly follow this by pulling out the wheel hub assembly.
Step 12: Pry the axel out of the transmission.
Step 13: Now install the new axel assembly in the reverse order of how you removed it.

Written by Andrew

"You're telling me it's got four wheels, two seats and goes faster than the speed limit? Good, I'm driving."

5 comments

  1. Guilty! I thought I had a pretty good idea of what I was driving over so I didn’t take the time to walk it or drive slowly over it. It’s a good thing my Dad wasn’t with me because I never would have heard the end of it. I’ll consider myself lucky if I can get it repaired before he finds out. It’s not the way I was taught as I’m sure he would be reminding me.

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  2. 4wd, or all wheel drive, doesn’t mean it will handle all terrains. I don’t know of a commercial vehicle that will do all of that. I’ve seen so many Jeeps run into the ground because the driver wasn’t informed of it’s limitations. There should be mandatory classes for diving off road. It bears little resemblance to on road driving. It should be, and is fun, but you have to use some common sense too. I think that’s beginning to be a lost art.

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  3. $2400.00 was the estimate I got. They also did not tell me that I could most likely do the repair myself. I realize they are in business to make money but they could also tell by looking at me that I did not have that kind of money. A buddy sent me to your site when I was whining to him about the repair that I couldn’t afford. My Dad has offered to help me out, both financially and with a little elbow grease. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

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  4. Guilty as charged. When the guys laughingly told me I should start notching my belt I figured it was time to change my errant ways. I may still have accidents that end up with a busted axel but it’s not because I haven’t scouted out the terrain ahead of time. Knock on wood!

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  5. Hey Neal, I think your expectations are a little high. Mechanics have to earn a wage too. Personally, I might have told you, but I have more work than I can handle. That’s not the story in other shops. I know how lucky I am and if I can save a customer some money, it’s good business cause they’ll remember that when the repair isn’t something they can do.

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